Friend describes victim in murder-suicide as “dedicated” and “good”

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (April 18, 2014) — As the community mourns the loss of Indianapolis Metropolitan police officer Kim Carmack, her friends and neighbors are describing the woman they knew and loved.

Police said Carmack was killed Thursday in her west side home by her ex-husband in an apparent murder-suicide.

Officer Carmack had served the force for more than two decades and in that time she made an impact on many people in and out of the department.

Her neighbors described her as a “no-nonsense” and “nice” woman. Her friend, Sgt. Dawn Higgins, said she was a “good” person.

“Hard worker and just a very, very conscientious person. Dedicated, a good friend, wonderful qualities. What you would hope for in a friend or a human being a police officer, all those things.”

Higgins works with domestic abuse victims at the Coburn Place where 35 families are currently seeking shelter. She said hearing about what happened to Carmack shook her to the core.

“Man I’ve had a lot of ‘what ifs’ in the last few hours,” said Higgins.

She said domestic violence happens more than people think and often times, people don’t want to believe that it’s happening to their neighbors or relatives. To know her own friend and fellow officer fell victim to it leaves her heartbroken.

“We face enough difficulties in policing in general. We always worry about what’s around the corner,” she said. “So to find out that within our own family that these things have become so problematic and dysfunctional they end in such tragic ways is really beyond description.”

Although she is devastated by the loss, she is determined to honor Carmack’s memory by helping others and spreading awareness about domestic violence.

“We need to get the word out that it cuts across everything, and every type of person, every ethnicity, every socioeconomic background,” said Higgins. “Whether we actually personally know someone or not, the tragedy of it is just so overwhelming.”