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FOX59 cameras follow cyclists, drivers to check safety

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By Jill Glavan

FISHERS, Ind. (July 15, 2014) -- In light of a Cicero cyclist's death Monday night and another on the north side in April, FOX59 attached its cameras to a group on the roads to see what happened.

Safety is on the minds of all cyclists, especially after 20-year-old Nicholas Camp lost his life biking in Cicero. Police believe a car clipped Camp's handlebars, causing him to crash. The driver didn't stop and police are still looking for that person.

"You know that it could always be you. It could be any of us," cyclist Don Birch said.

Birch and his fellow cyclists on Team Heroes ride competitively. They let FOX59 attach a camera to one of their bikes to see what safety on the road is like.

Experts say it's just as important for those on bikes to practice good safety measures and pay attention to drivers as it is for drivers to look out.

That proved true, as many cars passed the cyclists and all of them left a safe distance. In cities like Indianapolis and Carmel, there are laws requiring drivers to pass with at least three feet between the car and bike.

Birch wasn't surprised, saying for the most part drivers do a good job. Still, he said pretty much every cyclist has had a close call.

"I’ve never been hit but I’ve definitely been brushed by rear view mirrors or run off the road by someone just not paying attention or texting," Birch said.

At Bike Line in Broad Ripple, sales manager Josie Shannon knows that reality, too. She has a bumper sticker on her car to remind drivers about the three-foot rule.

"It's a good reminder to people as I'm going through town," Shannon said.

Still, she knows it's not always the driver's fault. So she also reminds fellow cyclists to stay in a safe spot on the road and share it with cars.

"You have to drive defensively (and) you have to cycle defensively," Shannon said.

Defensive work on both sides that was a good reminder on our trip, no matter how many wheels you're riding on.

For more on biking safety and laws, go to the Indy Cog webside here.