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Missing baby’s family attends Ten Point Coalition faith walk

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by Megan Trent

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (September 5, 2014) - The family of Delano Wilson, missing since August 27th, attended a faith walk Friday evening with members of the Ten Point Coalition.

Taniasha Perkins and Willie Wilson joined extended family members, neighbors, members of the Ten Point Coalition and other community members in front of their home on Chase Street just after 8 p.m. While the parents did not want to talk, they joined hands and wept as they walked to the alley in the 1400 block of Henry Street where Wilson says his son was abducted during an attempted robbery.

When the group arrived at the alley they formed a circle and joined together in prayer, asking God for justice, peace and courage. Faith leaders with the Ten Point Coalition also encouraged people with information to step forward in an effort to find Delano.

"We are still genuinely concerned about this heinous act of the disappearance of this six week old child," says Pastor Horatio Luster with the Ten Point Coalition. "We don't want the community to give up on it."

Afterwards, members and  Ten Point Coalition volunteers walked through the neighborhood, talking with people who live in the area.

"Some people who would not talk to the police that are familiar with the work that we do, they might just come out and say something that they did not tell the police," says Luster.

At 9:30 p.m., IMPD officers in the southwest district held late shift roll call on Chase Street. While roll call is being held publicly for all shifts in all IMPD districts as a sign of unity with the Indianapolis community, the southwest district met in this neighborhood intentionally.

"People on those streets know what happened, but they've got to call us and let us know," says IMPD Sgt. Kendale Adams. "So when we go out and we're shaking hands and we're making connections and we're forming relationships, that's how we reduce crime in our neighborhoods. That's how we find out the information that we need to solve these difficult cases."