Doctors warn about long-lasting effects of ‘Kylie Jenner Challenge’

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(April 22, 2015) -- Have you heard about the "Kylie Jenner Challenge”?

It is becoming all the rage on social media, and teens are trying to get the same big lips as the reality star.

But it turns out they are going to dangerous lengths to get the look, and doctors are urging teens not to try this at home.

If you click on the Kylie Jenner hashtag on Facebook, Twitter, or even Instagram you see there is no shortage of responses but doctors say hopping on this latest bandwagon could cost you in the long run.

Teens are putting their lips into a shot glass and sucking in as hard as they can to create a vacuum effect.

The goal is to look like 17-year-old Kylie Jenner. But for 23-year-old Rose Wright the outcome was a disaster. "There was some bruising. It’s numb now. When it first happened my lips were tingly then it went numb and now it’s like sore."

Dermatologist warn the effects can last longer than the latest fad on social media.

"What happens is the blood vessels can break so that can be a permanent break with permanent bruising and scarring permanent swelling of the lips. But also temporarily can cause really unsightly bruising around the lips,” said Dr. Beth Brogan, a dermatologist at St.Vincent Medical Group.

Another fear with this shortcut approach is even more dangerous when it comes to using glass on your lips.

"When a shot glass goes on your lips and you're sucking that air out of it there's a risk for the shot glass to break. Especially if there's a defect in the glass or something like that and that could cause a really serious cut that of course would leave a permanent scar,” said Brogan.

Social workers say this just speaks to the fact many people are feeding the social media beast in a quest to gain instant popularity like Kylie Jenner who denies ever going under the knife.

"Don't do it. I can't even go out in public. I don't know how long this is going to last,” said Wright.

These types of challenges make the rounds on social media often. Social workers say that's when parents need to step in and monitor social media sites to see what trends they're hopping on to and also who they're modeling their behavior after.