Elderly, handicapped residents forced to take stairs for weeks after elevator breaks

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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (Oct. 1, 2015)-- Dozens of elderly residents with serious health issues are struggling to get up and down the stairs at the Capitol Station senior housing complex on Indy’s south side.

The elevator at Capitol Station, which is supposed to be handicap accessible has been out of order for more than a month. Residents say management has continued to come up with reasons why the elevator has not been fixed.

“Quit lying and get it fixed,” said resident Carolyn Brock.

Some residents like 90-year-old Betty McFarland have not been outside of the apartment in more than a month.

“I have not been downstairs since this has happened,” said McFarland.

Residents say they are putting their health at risk to get in and out of the building.

“My doctor told me do not climb the stairs, but I have to. I do not have a choice,” said resident Bueford Collins.

Residents say they have fallen while trying to use the stairs. Maintenance crews are worried for their safety.

“People have already been hurt. Not bad, but they have been hurt,” said an employee.

We asked United Church Homes Inc., which owns Capitol Station, who is responsible for those injuries.

“I’m not going to make any response to that,” said John Renner of United Church Homes.

United Church Homes said the elderly have received assistance from volunteers to get up and down the steps. Residents say that is not true.

“This is pitiful and abusive to the elderly,” said resident Helen Wells.

Those that suffer from congestive heart failure, arthritis and other illnesses are left climbing the stairs alone. Residents say the only assistance they receive is from the chairs that are in the stairwell in case they need a break.