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Experts warn of security risks one year after Anthem data breach

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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (January 15, 2016) - It was nearly one year ago that Indianapolis-based Anthem, the country’s second-largest health insurer, said hackers stole personal information for 80 million customers.

Now, one year later, experts say the public remains equally at-risk.

The Anthem breach exposed the names, birthdays, addresses and Social Security numbers of current and former policyholders.

In response, Anthem offered free two-year credit protection to anyone affected.

Not only is that protection half over, experts say it’s not enough.

In one more year, Anthem’s free credit monitoring will end, and hackers will still have the data that was taken.

Experts say the data breach could affect customers and their family members for the rest of their lives, and a credit freeze is the only way to protect credit.

“Freezing your credit is the no-brainer-est of no-brainers,” said finance expert Peter Dunn. “It truly is something that every single person in America should do, it does not negatively impact your credit, and in Indiana it’s free to do so. Ultimately what it does is it locks the door to your identity.”

The Anthem breach was one of the largest, but it’s far from the only one. Target’s breach affected 70 million customers, while the The Home Depot’s breach affected 56 million, and there were many others.

Experts say health companies are targeted because they hold so much information. But even if you were never an Anthem customer, your information could easily be at risk from somewhere else.

Click here for more on credit freezes from the Indiana Attorney General.

More on reaching the three major credit reporting agencies: