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IN Focus: Indiana primary looking more and more relevant

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UNION CITY, Indiana (March 20, 2016) - It's looking more and more like Indiana's primary will actually make a difference in this year's race for President.

The reason? It all comes down to math.

While Donald Trump continues to rack up wins across the country, he's not winning delegates fast enough to have the nomination wrapped up before Indiana's primary on May 3, and he may still be shy of the magic number of 1,237 delegates when Republicans meet for their convention in July.

Our neighbors to the east helped slow Trump's march toward the nomination this past week, when Trump finished second in the Buckeye State to Ohio governor John Kasich.

Since Ohio is a winner-take-all state, Kasich nabbed all of Ohio's 66 delegates, which had they gone to Trump, may have sealed the deal for the GOP frontrunner.

Last week, FOX 59 traveled to Union City, Ohio, just across the street from its twin city, Union City, Indiana.

“Well as you know as an Indiana resident, it would be pretty hard to judge,” Jim Bretz said, a resident of Union City, Indiana. “I don’t know Kasich that well.”

One-by-one, Ohio voters in this small town of just more than 1,600 residents cast their ballots, helping to tell a much larger election story.

“Well it’s really important,” said Phil Detamore, who voted Tuesday. “We really only have one candidate from either party that’s capable of being president – John Kasich.”

Kasich's win helped block Trump from clinching the majority of delegates needed before the convention.

That thought is what prompted lifelong Democrat Terry Robison to vote Republican.

“The Democratic party, who I wanted to get it, is going to get it anyway,” he said. “And the Republican, I didn’t want Trump.”

And leading up to Tuesday, numerous Ohio counties reported hundreds of past Democratic voters requesting Republican absentee ballots.

“Well Trump’s the guy,” Bretz said, wishing he was voting Tuesday. “He’s got to go all the way.”

 

Meantime voters in Indiana hope the primary in May will actually make a difference this year.

“Of course I’m in business over there in Indiana and I get a lot of Buckeye customers,” Bretz said. “And they say my God I’m not going to vote for him, you know?”