Non-fatal shootings in Indianapolis on the rise compared to last year

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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. -- 2016 has gotten off to a violent start in Indianapolis.

So far this year, the number of non-fatal shootings are on the rise.

Overnight, three more people were hurt in two separate shootings on the east side. Two men were injured just after midnight on South Linwood. One was shot in the arm. The other suffered leg and head wounds.

An hour later and less than a mile away, a woman reported being shot in the leg outside a home on North Bosart Avenue.  The two shootings aren’t related, but they did scare neighbors.

“It’s nonsense.  There’s no reason for it,” said neighbor Alexandra Mcintire.

So far in 2016 there have been 150 non-fatal shootings.  That's up from last year when there were 108 at this time.  The year before in 2014 there were 110 non-fatal shootings.

Still, police say they're working to bring those numbers down.

“Chief Riggs is going to be adding more detectives to the aggravated assaults unit.  That is the unit that investigates non-fatal shootings,” said IMPD Sgt. Catherine Cummings.

Specifically, last week the IMPD graduated a new class of recruits. Some of those newly sworn in officers will be assigned to investigate non-fatal assaults.

The 150 number is personal for Alexandra because her boyfriend got shot in the leg two weeks ago in a different crime.

“It literally hit home.  I mean my boyfriend is one of those 150 that got shot after 2016 started,” said Alexandra.  “The doctor said if it was 4 inches to the left, he would have bled to death.”

Unfortunately, it’s not just non-fatal shootings that have gone up. This year’s criminal homicide numbers are also slightly higher compared to last year at this time, with 36 murders this year compared to 33 last year.

Police say those are not trends they can reverse overnight.

“This is not just law enforcement problem.  This is something that has taken many years to get here and it’s going to take a lot to fix it,” said Cummings.

Police say one of the things that makes it so hard to cut down on non-fatal shootings is that in many of the cases the victims refuse to cooperate with police to help catch the shooters.

So far no arrests have been made in either of the overnight crimes.