Chuck Pagano says Andrew Luck ‘is fine’

Andrew Luck (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Andrew Luck (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – OK, everyone can quit worrying about Andrew Luck.

“Andrew is fine,’’ coach Chuck Pagano said Friday.

Pagano’s terse back-and-forth with the media capped several days of speculation regarding the status of the Indianapolis Colts’ starting quarterback. The team created shockwaves when it listed Luck as a limited participant in Wednesday and Thursday practices. He participated fully Friday.

The reason: right shoulder. And it should be noted Luck dealt with, among other things, an injury to his right shoulder in 2015.

Pagano insisted there was “really nothing to elaborate on’’ regarding Luck being limited.

“I’m going to manage this football team and manage every player based on past history,’’ he said, adding the right shoulder designation was “past history.

“Andrew is fine.’’

Pagano also gave every indication Luck might appear on the NFL’s weekly injury/participation report moving forward.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if I was you,’’ he said.

Pagano seemed surprised the media has been fixated on Luck’s appearance on the participation report.

“I know you guys gotta do your job. I get it,’’ he said. “I’ve got to do mine, you’ve got to do yours.

“The sky’s falling, Chicken Little, oh my God . . . The kid’s fine. Let the kid go. Leave him alone. Let him play. I don’t know why we even talk about it.’’

Mewhort back:

The reports of Jack Mewhort’s demise were greatly exaggerated.

Not only did the team’s starting left guard go through a week of practice after suffering an injury to his right knee against Philadelphia Aug. 27, he’s a good bet to return to the starting lineup Sunday against the Detroit Lions.

Shortly after suffering the injury on the Colts’ next-to-last play of the first half against the Eagles, NFL.com reported “it was believed’’ Mewhort had suffered a season-ending torn ACL.

“The diagnosis wasn’t as bad as we initially thought,’’ Mewhort said. “A lot of people jumped to conclusions. I know from experience with my knee I had to wait for the MRI and wait for a definite scan to come through.

“It was kind of crazy how it all happened.’’

He shared a conversation he had with tackle Joe Reitz as the worst-case scenarios spread across social media.

“It was kind of like going to your own funeral,’’ Mewhort said. “I know what that’s like now.

“No one has X-ray vision, so you have to wait on that scan.’’

If the Colts decide to ease Mewhort back into action, Jon Harrison would start at left guard.

Mewhort, though, sounded like someone ready to dive back in. He was a full participant Friday.

“I feel good,’’ he said. “They wouldn’t put me back out there if they didn’t think I was ready.’’

More medical matters:

Ruled out of the Lions game are cornerbacks Vontae Davis (ankle) and Darius Butler (ankle), safety Clayton Geathers (foot) and defensive tackle Henry Anderson (knee). Mewhort, rookie offensive lineman Joe Haeg (ankle) and linebacker Sio Moore (hamstring) are questionable.

Defensive end Kendall Langford’s absence from the game-status report is encouraging even though he was a limited participant in practice Wednesday and Thursday and was held out entirely Friday. There’s a good chance he plays against the Lions, which would extend his streak of consecutive appearances to 129 games, the NFL’s longest active streak among defensive linemen. Langford underwent arthroscopic surgery on his right knee early last month.

The NFL has altered its Friday game-status report and no longer uses the “probable’’ designation. Questionable means there’s a 50-50 chance a player will play. Doubtful means there’s at least a 75 percent chance someone won’t play.