Neighbors react to IMPD warrant sweeps, arrests

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. -- Neighbors are now learning about the extent of the charges four people are facing after IMPD conducted search warrant sweeps across the city.

With help from SWAT teams, IMPD arrested four people at three different homes on the north side and west side in 2.5 hours.

Two of the sweeps were connected to places a violent convicted felon regularly stays.

Timothy Poole, 45, is charged with being a serious violent felon in possession of a firearm. He and his wife Natalie were arrested and both face a long list of charges, including drug dealing and possession and maintaining a common nuisance.

Their children were also at the home during the sweep and are now in the custody of Child Protective Services.

“It’s just a really quiet, peaceful place, so for someone of that type of background is kind of really hard to wrap my head around,” said Terri See, who lives on one of the streets where IMPD executed search warrants in connection with Poole.

Terri’s husband Bill says he’s noticed greater police presence in the neighborhood over the last few months.

“I think they should probably patrol even more than what they do, but what you do see is just wonderful,” said Bill. “The presence here helps a lot.”

IMPD spokesperson Sergeant Kendale Adams says that visibly increased presence is due to a return to community policing and returning narcotics units to the districts.

“We have sent those district narcotics units back to the district, so they can be hands on in the district, where the issues are occurring,” said Adams. “And the results speak for themselves.”

Adams says narcotics investigations often lead them to guns in the wrong hands and those sweeps are becoming more common, with hundreds of narcotics-related arrests and 133 guns seized.

In fact, just hours after this sweep, IMPD arrested Ernest Spey, 34, and James Conley, 33.

Officers took yet another gun—previously reported stolen—plus more drugs and money.

“If we can identify those individuals and get them either incarcerated or get them at least monitored, we can probably make a significant impact on crime,” said Adams.

The Sees hope the message that’s been sent on their block, is that neighbors won’t tolerate crime and will report it.

“I’d like to see this neighborhood cleaned up,” said Bill. “It’s really a nice neighborhood. It really is. And you know, the kids and stuff going to school just don’t need that kind of stuff. “

Sgt. Adams says officers depend on people like the Sees reporting suspicious behavior. And with narcotics detectives back in the districts, Adams says they’re following up on many more tips.