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Email paints dismal picture of Holy Cross College finances

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — An email mistakenly sent to the entire student body of northern Indiana’s Holy Cross College has stirred fears among the school community by painting a dismal picture of the college’s finances and its future.

The email sent Friday was written by Kelly Jordan, the school’s vice president for student affairs. In it, Jordan said “it may be that I will spend the better part of the coming school year closing down the College.”

“All we can do is try our hardest and hope for the best!” she added, The South Bend Tribune reported.

The newspaper, which obtained a copy of the email, said it spread quickly among students, employees and alumni, raising fears about the future financial well-being of the Roman Catholic four-year liberal arts college.

The South Bend Tribune reports several students contacted the newspaper saying they shared the email with their parents and are concerned that the school may close before they can graduate.

Holy Cross College, which has about 529 students on its South Bend campus, is facing serious financial challenges, but its academic accreditation remains intact.

The college has been ordered by the Higher Learning Commission, an accrediting agency, to develop a plan to get out from under increasing borrowing and the need to eliminate positions each summer to balance its budget.

The email’s accidental release comes only weeks after the college’s president, Brother John Paige, abruptly left that post.

Paige was replaced on April 7 by the Rev. David Tyson, an administrator at the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame.

Tyson sent an email Friday afternoon to students and employees saying that the email mistakenly sent earlier that day is “one person’s opinion and does not reflect the conversations that the Board of Trustees and administration are having about the future of the College.”

He added that he’s working with the trustees and its partners “to develop a robust plan” for the college and says its future appears bright.