“The Mob” gang members charged in more than 20 Indy pharmacy robberies

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. -- Investigators say members of an Indianapolis street gang called "The Mob" committed more than 20 pharmacy robberies in Indiana and one in Kentucky since 2014.

On Tuesday, U.S. Attorney Josh Minkler announced charges against the gang members. The following adults were named, along with their aliases, as defendants in the 31-page federal indictment:

  • Larry Warren, aka Bayboy, 19
  • Miguel Chambers, aka Mick, 20
  • Anthony Jackson, aka Ace, 19
  • Kye Jackson, aka Fatty, 22
  • Duwan Byers, aka Rockhead, 21
  • Devon Taylor, 20
  • Alphonse Turner, aka Weezy, 24
  • Justin Rudolph, 23
  • John Doe, aka Tote/Toro

Byers is still wanted by authorities.

Officials say “The Mob” is a criminal organization in Indianapolis who  committed robberies, used and distributed drugs and threatened the use of violence. One unidentified individual is being charged with murder in an Oct. 2015 case.

The group allegedly used Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to post photos, videos and statements that identified the gang and its members as well as highlighted their criminal activity.

The gang forbids members from providing any information to law enforcement officers and threatens violence, including murder, against those who do cooperate with police.

In addition to robbing pharmacies with firearms, the suspects are also accused of distributing prescription drugs, marijuana and synthetic marijuana, and other controlled substances including Oxycodone, morphine, Hydrocodone, Adderall, Roxicodone and more.

The gang members drew from a pool of individuals they call “peons” to serve as accomplices in the crimes, police say. Many of these were juveniles as young as 12. Several juveniles have been arrested, but won't be identified until they are moved to adult court.

The pharmacy robberies date from December 2014 - June 2016. The group reportedly operated on the near north side of the city near 40th Street and Boulevard Place.

“Today’s defendants made a living terrorizing the citizens of Indianapolis by robbing local pharmacies, then selling the drugs on the street,” said Minkler. “Their reign of terror is over and now face the hammer of federal law enforcement.”

The suspects in the case are being charged under the RICO statute. A RICO conviction carries a maximum 20-year sentence and a fine of up to $250,000. Each other count in the case also carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.