Teen could face charge after 5-year-old is shot with BB gun

INDIANAPOLIS -- A 5-year-old boy is out of the hospital after a nearly tragic event over the weekend.

Bentley Chestnut of Anderson had been at Riley Memorial Children's Hospital since getting shot in the head with a BB gun Friday night.

His mother, Natasha McAdams was with her son when it happened.

“All you heard was a little pop," the mother said. "Sounded like a little firecracker.”

A CT Scan of Bentley Chestnut's head which shows where the pellet still sits.

McAdams was one of two adults, each driving a golf cart. Bentley was one of five children riding along.

Instantly, the boy was screaming and crying.

“I just wrapped my hand around him and you could just feel the blood coming," McAdams said.

According to his doctors, Bentley's skull hasn't thickened due to his age, which allowed the apparent BB to go deep into his skull.

"He is very fortunate it didn’t damage any blood vessels and it’s wedged between several major veins," said Dr. Andrea Scherer, a pediatric neurosurgeon in fellowship with Riley and St. Vincent Hospital.

The pellet is still in Bentley's skull, which is why doctors aren't exactly sure what kind of bullet struck the child. Scherer said removing it is too risky at this time. Doctors will continue to monitor the child's head. If the pellet begins to migrate, they’ll have to consider surgery. They believe Bentley will go on to have a normal childhood.

“He has done very well," said Scherer. "He has no neurological deficits, he’s acting like himself."

The doctor said she and her colleagues are always in disbelief when a child comes in with any kind of gun-related wound. There isn't too much data about children and gun-injury recoveries, but the child can't have an MRI due to BBs being magnetic.

Bentley also will also have to avoid the swimming pool for a month while his wound heals.

On Monday afternoon, detectives in Anderson found a teenage boy who they believe pulled the trigger that ended up sending the child to the hospital. So far into the investigation, police don't believe the 14-year-old intentionally shot the boy.

A spokesperson with the Anderson Police Department said the teenager's parents questioned their son when they read about the child's injury online. The teen had been playing with friends in the area when the boy was hurt. A prosecutor could charge the teen with criminal recklessness.

Police said the teen was using a pump-action BB gun that allows the user to pump the gun several times to increase the force of a shot.