Woman returns car after being accused of scamming local car dealerships

UPDATE: According to the general manager of Capitol City Ford, Dean Wilson, the woman reportedly saw herself on TV Thursday and returned the vehicle to the dealership.

She told Wilson she thought she was still on a test drive. She agreed to leave the keys in the glove box and told Wilson where to retrieve the vehicle.

Police told Wilson they are issuing a warrant out for her arrest because she allegedly has done this multiple times.

Original Story:

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. -- An accused con artist is wanted for ripping off car dealers around Indianapolis.  Police say the suspect has scammed multiple dealerships, including two in the last week.

This week, the suspect came into Capitol City Ford on Indy’s east side pretending she wanted to buy a car and started filling out paperwork.

“She presented herself well. It’s obviously something she’s done before. She was very comfortable and very believable,” said Capitol City Ford General Manager Dean Wilson.

Wilson says after the woman got approved for a loan, she needed to go home to get some additional paperwork. After giving the dealership a copy of her drivers license, under the name Yolanda Shields, the dealership let her temporarily take the car off the lot, but she never returned.

It turns out just 3 days earlier, police reports state the same woman came to a different dealership on 16th St. where she took a Ford Fusion for a test drive, before stealing that car as well.

Last year, police say a woman again using the same name rented a pickup from a south side U-Haul before again refusing to return the truck.

“It’s very frustrating that someone is willing to do that. It’s more frustrating that there don’t seem to be a lot of repercussions,” said Wilson.

Because the woman didn't actually break into the cars, even if she is caught she may only be facing misdemeanor charges of criminal conversion, in other words using someone else’s property without their permission.

“It sounds like it’s going to be a slap on the wrist which is very unfortunate,” said Wilson.  “If there’s not a deterrent people won’t stop committing crimes.”

It's not clear if the suspect’s real name is Yolanda Shields, or if her contact information is legit or bogus.  No criminal charges have ever been filed against anyone using that name.

Either way, Wilson says he simply wants the woman arrested before she takes advantage of any other businesses.

“She absolutely deserves to be caught and hopefully more than just a slap on the wrist. That would be my hope,” said Wilson.

Anyone with information on the suspect is asked to contact Crime Stoppers at 317-262-TIPS.