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Home security systems gain popularity with rise in high-profile crime

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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (Apr. 16, 2014) — As high-profile, violent crime continues to rise, more and more Hoosiers are turning to security systems in order to feel safe in their own homes.

Indianapolis-based DEFENDER Direct recently installed its one-millionth home security system nationally, weeks ahead of when it had expected.

“As a father of three daughters and soon-to-be grandfather, I couldn’t imagine one of my children living without a security system,” Chief Operating Officer Jim Boyce told FOX59.  “It’s very important to me if I travel, for example, that my wife Cindy has a security system available to her.  [It] gives me peace of mind.”

Installations in Indianapolis are increasing, Boyce said, especially since an October 2013 north side home invasion and sexual assault shook many families’ sense of security.

“I strongly recommend a security system.  Not only for the peace of mind, but the notifications that it’ll give you that something is not right in your home,” he said.  “Garage doors, for example, have garage door sensors put on.  The very unfortunate incident that you mentioned here that happened in Indianapolis, one of several, as I understand it, began with a garage door being left open.”

Home security systems can include not only the all-important police notification alarm, but also security cameras inside and outside the home, remote door locks and sensors, motion sensors and control of the entire system through a sophisticated smartphone app, allowing people to make sure their home is protected no matter where they are.

With or without a system, Boyce recommends people help protect their families by taking simple, common sense steps that many often forget about.

First, before opening the front door, make sure you have visual confirmation of who you are letting in, either through a peep hole or nearby window.  Second, clear any debris, which can give potential intruders a place to hide, away from first-floor windows.  Also, Boyce said it’s important to lock all doors and windows, even windows that are on the upper levels of a home.

 “It’s not uncommon at all for a customer to be prompted to call us because of an unfortunate event in their neighborhood or perhaps that has happened to them or a loved one.”