City, community and faith-based leaders making plan to curb Indy crime

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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (June 6, 2014) — Leaders from churches and community groups came together Friday morning for the second annual Ten Point Coalition Community Prayer Breakfast at Bankers Life Fieldhouse Friday morning.

The event raised funds and distribute resources to make Indianapolis safer.

“It’s a way to generate money and resources to encourage people to play a role in the fight against crime and violence,” said the Rev. Charles Ellis with the Ten Point Coalition.

“We just want to make sure we show our support, because they’re out there in the middle of the night and they’ve been there for the past decade, but they need help and this is our opportunity to provide resources for them to continue to do the great work that they do,” said Indianapolis Metro Police Chief Rick Hite.

The coalition is putting together an action plan which includes canvasing neighborhoods, particularly the zip codes of 46208 and 46205 where there have been several recent homicides. Another element of the plan is a summer jobs initiative to help at-risk youth find work.

“There’s enough for everyone to do, for everyone to play a role. Not everyone may want to walk the streets, but you can mentor, talk to young people about crime, start with your own home and take some responsibility,” Ellis said.

Rep. Andre Carson, D-Indianapolis, was the keynote speaker at the event. Ellis said the coalition and Carson are having discussions about finding ways to federally fund outreach and crime prevention programs in Indianapolis.

At last check, Indianapolis Metropolitan police had investigated 68 homicides and 63 murders in 2014, including the fatal shooting on Edgecomb Avenue late Thursday.  At this point in 2013, there were 55 homicides and 48 murders in IMPD’s jurisdiction.

“We really have a lot of work to do help people cope and deal with basic conflict and, you know, conflict mediation, how do you deal with that and, you know, the solution isn’t to pull a gun out and just start shooting one another,” Ellis said.

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