Community activist resigns from Ten Point Coalition

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INDIANAPOLIS (June 17, 2014) – A longtime member of the Ten Point Coalition who faces felony charges has resigned from the group.

Byron Alston, who’s been with the Ten Point Coalition for 15 years, resigned Friday.

“The board of directors of Indianapolis Ten Point Coalition appreciate Alston’s many years of service and hard work in order to help make Indianapolis a safer place. We wish him well in all his future endeavors,” the group said in a statement released Tuesday morning.

In February, investigators raided Alston’s home as part of a grand jury investigation. FOX59 was the first to report about the raid. Alston told FOX59 detectives took his computer and financial records, and asked him if a Republican ever offered him a large sum of money.

Alston, Ten Point Coalition officials and Republican city leaders questioned whether the raid was politically motivated. Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry called the insinuation “dead wrong” and said he’d notified city officials about the raid and the reason behind it.

In May, Alston was charged with four counts of tax evasion and one count of perjury after prosecutors say he lied about his income.

Prosecutors also questioned money spent for Alston’s “Save the Youth” foundation, a nonprofit group not affiliated with the Ten Point Coalition. He bought a Ford pickup truck under the organization’s name, prosecutors said, and received tax exemptions because of the group’s status as a nonprofit. Three months later, he transferred ownership to himself with no record of payment to Save the Youth. Court documents also said Alston lied in court about the number of vehicles he owned.

Alston, a convicted felon and former youth pastor, served as an outreach worker for the Ten Point Coalition, responding to homicide and violent crime scenes to engage at-risk youth.

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