Cooler temperatures helping personal landscaping, businesses’ bottom lines

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By Michael Henrich

BROWNSBURG, Ind. (July 17, 2014) -- Below-average July temperatures have given the recently maligned landscaping industry a boost this summer, according to businesses interviewed by FOX59 News.

After at least two straight difficult summers, which have included high temperatures and drought, the cooler temperatures and rainfall during the summer of 2014 have given the landscaping industry another chance.

Dottie Warner, of Frazee Garden Center in Brownsburg, said the difference has been clear.

"This has been perfect weather for landscaping as opposed to the summer of 2012, which was almost as bad as it could get," Warner said.  "It was too hot.  It was too dry.  The economy was bad.  This year people have been more positive [and] more upbeat.”

Plus, Warner said they've been more willing to spend time outside tending to their gardens and, therefore, more willing to invest in their plants and lawns.

Patriot Landscaping LLC owner Jason Thompson has also noticed a difference.

"Last year was really dry and didn't really have people wanting us to come out and mow when there’s nothing to mow," Thompson told FOX59.  "It’s definitely helped with the cooler temperatures and the rain."

Warner said this summer's weather has been great for growing, which does come with some things on which to keep an eye.

First, Warner said some people have been so trained by previous year's droughts to constantly water their lawns and gardens in the summer that they're not taking current rainfall into account and overwatering their landscaping.

Second, good growing weather is also good for weeds.

Warner recommends pulling weeds vigilantly and keeping your grass at a healthy length, rather than automatically going for the putting green look.  She also said fertilizer will help your grass grow and crowd out some of the weeds.