Locking your car isn’t enough to keep thieves away

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GREENWOOD, Ind. (July 23, 2015) – Locking your car doors isn’t enough to keep thieves out.  Thieves are busting windows, slashing jeep covers and even using their own tools to break in.

In the past week, Greenwood Police have received at least eight reports of thefts from vehicles.  In every case the car doors were locked.  In every case the owner left valuables out in plain sight.

“Your car is not a secure vault. Anybody at any given time or the inclination to do so can get in your car,” explains Matthew Fillenwarth, with the Greenwood Police Department.

Sometime Monday night, thieves took a knife to the outside of Cecilia Mencia’s jeep, destroying her cover.  The thieves stole all her tools that were in her jeep, $1400 worth.

“Have a little respect for things we’ve worked hard for,” explains Cecilia Mencia, whose jeep was broken into.

The same night thieves hit Mencia’s jeep, Angie’s Pool and Spa was hit, too. Thieves used their own tools to get inside three of the work vans and took off with thousands of dollars in tools.

“We only work six months out of the year so those six months we’ve got to bust out a lot to get our money’s worth, so with them stealing all our stuff it just doesn’t help us,” admits Lauren Wolff, with Angie’s Pool and Spa.

All the break-ins were spread across the city so at this time police do not think they are connected.

“People think it’s the summer time it’s the kids, they’re out of school and they’re out breaking into cars. Yes, that does happen as well but the majority of these people aren’t Greenwood residents, they aren’t Greenwood teenagers, they’re drug addicts looking to get their hands on anything they can steal,” explains Matthew Fillenwarth, with the Greenwood Police Department.

Whoever it is, Mencia wants them to know it’s not about the property; it’s more about the principle.

“If you were in our shoes it probably wouldn’t feel very good either,” says Mencia.