‘Your Town Friday’ travels up to Crawfordsville!

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CRAWFORDSVILLE, Ind. -- As "Your Town Friday" heads to Crawfordsville, we make our first stop at a most inauspicious place--the Rotary Jail Museum.

"The Rotary Jail, the house and jail, began construction in 1881.  The construction was actually part of a design that was developed in Indy.  It's the first rotary jail and today it’s the last one that still spins and can operate like originally intended," said Executive Director Matt Salzman.

"It was the jail of Montgomery County from 1882 to 1973.  For 91 years it was actually a running jail.  The facility went through many changes.  In 1938 it stopped spinning due to safety concerns of both fires and injuries sustained by prisoners," Matt said. "They cut doors into the cells, welded it into place and after renovations when it closed, it turned into a museum in 1975 and could actually spin again once again."

According to Matt, only 18 such jails were made and only three are left. The other two are in Missouri and Iowa, but the Crawfordsville's is the only one that still spins like it was originally intended.

"Today we have the Rotary Jail Museum and a Cultural Center.  Usually we do a tour around 45 minutes to one hour and they stay and look at artifacts, walk around the house, talk about the house, see where the gallows were located. We did have two executions here and people like to hear the stories about those.

"When you come here you’ll go through several levels of the actual jail and get to see the basement.  You'll get a good look at how the toilets work, the gears work, how it spins and operates and then we’ll come walk through the jail, go into a jail cell, on second floor is the women’s cells and solitary confinement and you can walk on the catwalk just above."

The Rotary Jail Museum is open for walk-in tours Wednesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

"Who doesn’t love candy?  It's something everybody likes and it makes nice gift items.  It's something special especially when it's homemade candy," said Lynda Dunbar, owner of Completely Nuts and Candy Company.

Lynda opened Completely Nuts and Candy Company last year and all of her nuts and candy are fresh and delicious!  The candy is hand-rolled and hand-dipped.  It's made that week with a shelf life of 30 to 40 days and no preservatives are added.

"We have about 30 different flavors of creams that we make all in house.  We also have truffles that are homemade.  Our specialty is turtles and sea salt caramels.  We make our caramel from scratch and then we supplement the rest of our candy with bulk candy that we get from an Indiana company up north like gummy bears, triple dip malted milk balls and double dip peanuts," Lynda said.

"People are kind of surprised at the variety of candy that we have.  We're unique, we have 30 different flavors of cream like root beer, key lime, tropical fruit that has chopped up cranberry and orange inside, we try to add something inside all of the candy that’s a little special."

Lynda says the candy is a lot like what you'd expect your grandmother to make.  She started creating recipes with her mom 16 years ago.

Soon after opening the candy shop, a cafe space next door became available.  Lynda bought it and opened "The Luncheonette" where it's all about fresh, quick, quality lunch items from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

"Our main goal is to serve really fresh lunch items.  We've taken simple sandwiches and added a simple twist, like with the turkey we add cranberry, so it's a turkey cranberry sandwich," Lynda said.

"Our chicken salad is a little different than everybody else because it's a pineapple cashew chicken salad.  We bake our bread fresh here every day, we get our bread dough in and so it's freshly baked every day which adds a nice twist.  We make our soups every day and we also hand-make salads to order."

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