Graphic photos of evidence released in murder case of IU student Hannah Wilson

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NASHVILLE, Ind. - Tuesday was an important day in the trial of the man accused of killing an Indiana University student last year. Jurors saw graphic pictures of blood-spattered clothing police say Daniel Messel was wearing the night Hannah Wilson died. The evidence included a red IU pull over, a pair of Messel's shoes, jeans, and his silver Kia Sportage which police testified all were spattered with Wilson’s blood.

The prosecution also had Michael Raymond, a serology expert who analyzes DNA for the Indiana State Police testify that Wilson’s blood was found on those clothes. These are major pieces of evidence in the case against Daniel Messel, the man accused of brutally murdering 22-year-old IU student Hannah Wilson then throwing her body to the side of the road in rural Brown County.

Messel is being held at the Brown County Jail after being accused of beating Hannah Wilson to death, just hours after she was seen alive and partying with friends near the IU Campus on April 24, 2015. She was dropped off at home by a taxi, but her friends reported her missing when they found her cell phone and purse on her bed and the front door wide open the next morning. Officers found Hannah’s body the next day on a rural road in Brown County, around 30 minutes from campus.

Police arrested Daniel Messel after investigators found his cell phone next to Wilson’s feet and observed him with a plastic garbage bag full of clothes and with claw marks on his forearms.

The defense argued that police only focused on Messel as a suspect and never looked at other possibilities. The defense also said that Messel’s blood was not on Hannah’s t-shirt.

Closing arguments in the Messel trial start tomorrow. Messel did not testify.

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