Soccer star from Indianapolis diagnosed with brain tumor during pregnancy

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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – Indianapolis native and former star of the U.S. women’s national soccer team Lauren Holiday has been diagnosed with a brain tumor while carrying her first child, the New Orleans Times-Picayune reports.

The former Ben Davis High School student who retired from professional soccer to start her family is expecting to give birth in October, but persistent headaches and a subsequent doctor’s visit revealed that Lauren has a benign brain tumor near her orbital socket that requires surgery.

Lauren is set to have the surgery to remove the tumor six weeks after she gives birth, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

Lauren, a two-time Olympic gold medalist, lives in New Orleans with her husband Jrue Holiday, who plays for the Pelicans. Jrue will miss the start of the season to tend to his family. The couple will spend the next few months in North Carolina, which is closer to Lauren’s doctors at Duke University.

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Best 3 years of my life. I love you.

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“Obviously, we were and are still very excited about the birth of our first child, but our focus shifted from having this magnificent blessing to making sure everything is going to be OK with Lauren and the child,” Jrue told the Times-Picayune. “Our priorities right now are being able to manage Lauren’s symptoms and still have a fairly healthy pregnancy.”

Jrue told the Times-Picayune their baby is healthy, but Lauren has numbness on the right side of her face because the tumor is pressing on a nerve.

“We just ask for your prayers, really pray for my family,” Jrue told the newspaper. “We can take all the prayers that we can get.”

 

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