Remembering Pearl Harbor 75 years later

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HONOLULU, HI – On December 7, 1941, hundreds of Japanese planes launched an attack on the US Navy's fleet at Pearl Harbor in O'ahu, Hawaii.

Japan and the US had been edging toward war for decades.

The US was unhappy with the way Japan treated China so they refused to trade with them--cutting off Japan's oil supply and other resources.

The Japanese attacked on Sunday morning because they thought the US soldiers would be less alert.

21 American ships were destroyed during the attack.

More than 2,400 people were killed and another 1,000 were wounded.

The biggest US loss came when a bomb smashed through the deck of the USS Arizona.

More than 1,100 Americans died when the Arizona sunk.

The Japanese thought if they took out the war ships in Pearl Harbor,  the US wouldn't be able to fight back.

But they were mistaken and the US declared war on Japan the next day.

Today, there is a memorial dedicated to the US soldiers who lost their lives during the attack. The USS Arizona Memorial floats on the water above the wreckage of the USS Arizona.

On this 75th anniversary, we remember the US service members who made the ultimate sacrifice for our nation.