‘Hidden pharmacy’ looks to crackdown on robberies, medication abuse

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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. -- An Indianapolis pharmacy touting a “controlled” operation is hoping their way of doing business will help to crackdown on issues that plague the state, like pharmacy robberies and prescription drug abuse.

The location of Cordant Health Solutions’ controlled substance pharmacy is kept from the public. It’s not open to anyone other than clients. And just to get into the facility, you have to pass a security guard and a locked door with a keypad. Those steps only begin the process.

“We like to say that we manage the prescriptions from start to finish. We’re getting the prescriptions directly from the provider, (either electronically or through a courier) we’re managing them, we are insuring the patients receive what they have been written for in a timely matter by delivering those medications to their home or place of work really wherever they need,” said Trent Roesch, Regional Business Development Representative for Cordant Health Solutions.

Roesch says Cordant administers the medications based on provider instruction. However, Cordant also uses INSPECT, the state’s prescription drug monitoring database, to help identify “risks” in patients. They then use that information to communicate with providers and help adjust their medication administration approach.

“Not all providers are the same, not all patients have the same needs, and we recognize this and then conform,” Roesch said.

Once a prescription is filled, a courier delivers the medication directly to the patient or an assigned proxy using a courier. Only people approved to receive the medication can take possession of it.

“In no case is this medication being left in the mailbox, on the porch, or someplace where somebody who's not intended to can get their hands on it,” Roesch said.

The pharmacy also offers its own prescription take back program to help prevent abuse or medications falling into the wrong hands.

Roesch says Cordant believes their pharmacy model can serve as an example for others looking for solutions to crackdown on both pharmacy robberies and prescription abuse. He says Cordant plans to open other pharmacies is Kentucky, Massachusetts and New York, as well as expand their business to include Lafayette and the Chicagoland area.

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