$1M lawsuit filed against Isaac Haas claims Purdue star lied about STD, infected former partner

LAFAYETTE, Ind. – A civil lawsuit has been filed against Purdue basketball standout Isaac Haas, accusing him of lying about an STD and infecting a former female partner.

Alyssa Chambers filed the $1 million lawsuit in Tippecanoe Circuit Court on Tuesday. Another woman, Madison Millsaps, and Purdue University are also named as defendants in the suit.

The filing says Haas and Millsaps have liability for Chambers being infected because they tried to cover up Haas’ infections and tried to dispute her allegations, as well as tried to persuade Chambers not to file the lawsuit.

The lawsuit says Haas and Chambers engaged in a brief sexual encounter on May 15, 2017 and the plaintiff was found to be infected with herpes two weeks later. The woman claims she had not had sexual relations with anyone but Haas between the day they had sex and the day she was diagnosed.

Haas told Chambers that he’d been treated for chlamydia and was “clean” by the time they got together, the lawsuit says. Haas claimed he’d been tested, diagnosed, treated and tested again by the university’s student health services, who told him he was “clean,” according to the lawsuit.

Millsaps became involved in the case when she allegedly texted Chambers, accusing Haas of also infecting her with herpes. When Millsaps learned the plaintiff’s attorney filed a motion to preserve electronic data through one of Haas’ coaches, the lawsuit claims Millsaps texted the plaintiff.

"I caught wind of Isaac getting his papers and that my name was mentioned via one of the coaches. I don't want any part of this, nor can I. With nursing school, my godmom having cancer and my dad being deployed, I ask that if it's possible, please do not call me in to testify,” Millsaps allegedly wrote, according to the lawsuit. "... A lot of stuff you heard from me wasn't true because I was mad at Isaac, and I was trying to intentionally (mess) with you."

The lawsuit claims that text represents “either an admission of an intentional infliction of emotional harm, or evidence of a conspiracy among Haas, Millsaps and Purdue coaches to cover up Haas' knowledge and wrongful conduct, just as he had previously indicated he would do.”

In a text to Millsaps included in exhibits, Haas allegedly wrote “I feel horrible about it. But she wants to not only ruin my life, but others around me, and put her name out there like that?”

Chambers is asking for a jury trial and petitions for judgment against Haas, Millsaps and the university to compensate her for her injuries, damages, costs and expenses.

FOX59 reached out to Purdue, but the university declined to comment.