IN Focus: Indiana politicians come to Coats’ defense after Russia summit

President Donald Trump said Thursday he is “looking forward” to meeting again with Russian President Vladimir Putin to “begin implementing” issues they discussed during their summit earlier this week.

Trump, who touched off a major political controversy with his embrace of Putin in Helsinki, Finland, accused the news media — which he again dubbed the “enemy of the people” — of distorting the summit and pining for a confrontation between the US and Russia.

In a series of tweets Thursday morning, Trump argued his summit with Putin “was a great success.”

“The Summit with Russia was a great success, except with the real enemy of the people, the Fake News Media,” Trump said. “I look forward to our second meeting so that we can start implementing some of the many things discussed, including stopping terrorism, security for Israel, nuclear proliferation, cyber attacks, trade, Ukraine, Middle East peace, North Korea and more.”

“There are many answers, some easy and some hard, to these problems…but they can ALL be solved!” Trump tweeted.

Putin has signaled in the wake of his summit with Trump that he and the US President reached several agreements, but neither Trump nor the White House have confirmed any substantive agreements between the two countries.

Trump’s tweets on Thursday come as he has alternated between trying to quell a political uproar over his comments in Helsinki — he refused to back the US intelligence community’s assessment of Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election during a joint news conference with Putin, instead touting Putin’s strong denials — and his desire to not back down or apologize over his performance.

Trump subsequently said he misspoke, but has not acknowledged that he repeatedly put the US intelligence community’s assessment and Putin’s denials on the same footing.

Instead, Trump has used his clean-up remarks to again insist that there was “no collusion” between his campaign and Moscow, while also insisting that it “could be other people also” who interfered in the 2016 election.

And while he later acknowledged in an interview with CBS News that Putin was responsible for the effort to undermine the election, he only attributed that responsibility to Putin being “in charge of the country.” The New York Times later reported, and the former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper confirmed to CNN, that Trump was briefed on specific US intelligence indicating that Putin personally ordered the 2016 Russian influence campaign.

Trump on Wednesday again reignited the controversy when he replied “no” when asked if Russia is still targeting the United States, directly contradicting the current Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders claimed later in the day that Trump was saying “no” to answering additional questions.

Meanwhile, Trump has railed throughout the week at the news media, blaming reporters for negative coverage of the summit, even though much of the reporting has focused on Republicans’ condemnations.

Trump’s “enemy of the people” attack on Thursday marked the second time Trump has emerged from a summit with a dictator who has restricted press freedoms and subsequently attacked the news media as an “enemy.”