Woman renting previously vacant home upset after trying to get city’s help with dumping

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – A young woman who recently moved into a rental home told FOX59 she tried to get the city's help with dumping problems in her backyard, but ended up with health department violations instead.

Morgan Oster moved into a house on the southeast side recently. Neighbors said the house had been vacant for a couple of years and attracted illegal dumping in the back alley.

Oster said her landlords, Burger LLC and Stella Lebaron, cleaned up trash in the area before she moved in, but the next day furniture was dumped in the same place.

"I didn’t expect to have to clean up someone else’s entire living room from my backyard," Oster said.

Oster said she called the Mayor's Action Center for help, and she was initially told that it would be investigated.

"They told me that they would either cite the person responsible and have it removed themselves or that the person responsible would remove the trash," Oster said.

After she didn't hear back for a week, Oster said she tried again, and was sent to the health department. The next day, a health inspector showed up at the property and opened a case, noting multiple violations for trash and the condition of the backyard.

"It just is backwards and it’s not right and it’s not fair," Oster said.

On Friday, while FOX59 was at the property, Oster's leasing manager and a neighbor removed the furniture and trash.

City officials said they do allow for a one-time affidavit for illegal dumping, but that in this case an investigation resulted in the issue being sent due to the health department, since the home is now occupied. Another inspection will be scheduled in the coming weeks.

In the meantime, Oster said she hopes the illegal dumping will stop.

"With all due respect, I think it’s just laziness. I think that maybe they don’t want to pay to dump or they just don’t want to deal with the problem, they don’t want it sitting on their property, so they just kind of push it off onto someone else," Oster said.