Parents of Wabash football player raising awareness about suicide prevention

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CARMEL, Ind. – Evan Hansen was a star football player at Wabash College. A captain on the team and at 21 years old, he had so much going for him. But, two days after senior day, Evan took his own life.

“The initial shock was gut-wrenching,” said Chuck Hansen Evan’s father.

For the past year, Chuck and Mary Hansen knew their son was dealing with depression but never saw any sign of him being suicidal.

“I think a lesson from Evan is, if someone appears to have everything going for them, they can actually feel like this on the inside. It can affect anyone and that’s something that needs to get out there,” said Chuck Hansen.

Evan’s heartbroken parents are on a mission to raise awareness about suicide prevention. They’re reminding those who are suffering that no matter what, you can get help.

“When the voices are telling you to go away by yourself, don’t go away by yourself, reach out,” said Chuck Hansen.

Evan’s father created a Facebook tribute page. So far, people have been sharing memories and more. Some are admitting they survived a suicide attempt and others grieving over losing a loved one.

“I don’t think some people like to talk about it, they’re embarrassed or whatever. It’s not really anything to be embarrassed about,” said Mary Hansen.

Evan’s parents are encouraging those who aren’t suffering to have the difficult talk with someone else who may be.

“If everyone reached out to two or three people a lot of good things would happen,” said Chuck Hansen.

Evan wanted to be a nurse and a Spanish translator in an underprivileged community. He impacted so many people and now through his story, he’s impacting even more.

“I’m not going to let your legacy be lost,” said Chuck Hansen.

Evan’s parents gave Boston University permission to test his brain for CTE, a brain disease found in many athletes with head injuries. It could take months before the test results are completed.

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