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Indianapolis memorial service honors 11 killed in Pittsburgh synagogue shooting

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.-- Eleven candles flickered at the front of the Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation Monday, honoring the 11 people killed at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh.

"There are no words which can adequately describe the feeling of gathering once again in response to tragedy," Rabbi Brett Krichiver of the Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation said.

More than 1,000 people of all faiths attended the memorial service, remembering the lives lost and standing together in a call to stop hate.

"We must call out and name the hatred that once festered in the darkness that is now openly displayed," Professor Jeremy Price told the crowd.

Price recalled worshiping at the Tree of Life Synagogue, and his memories of Jerry Rabinowitz, a hero doctor who was killed when he ran in to help others, and his friend, Dan, who was injured doing the same.

"If we are to bind up the nation's wounds it will only be if each of us has the courage to voice what is true and what is right, to drown out the shouts of hate with a broad communal chorus, one that proclaims that all people of every faith belong here," Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett said.

Elected leaders, different faith leaders and community members joined together in a call for peace and prayer, and to do more.

"Let us not ignore the proliferation of guns in our country and the lack of a hate crimes law our state. We do not need more guns," Rabbi Dennis Sasso of Congregation Beth El Zedeck said to a standing ovation from many.

Grief and resilience intertwined as speakers called on a stop to antisemitism and hate, and called on others to speak out against it when it's observed.

"We must recognize evil for what it is and speak against it at every opportunity," Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard. said.

Going forward, they called on the hundreds of people to not forget and remember the legacy of those taken in an act of hate.