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Indy’s mayor, police chief discuss results of public safety efforts in 2018

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — Mayor Joe Hogsett and Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Chief Bryan Roach discussed crime trends in Indianapolis as the year draws to a close.

Deputy Chief Chris Bailey and Shonna Majors from the Office of Public Health and Safety also spoke Tuesday morning at the John H. Boner Center in Indianapolis.

“The truth is too many neighborhoods still exist where residents feel unsafe in too many homes family grieve loved ones taken too soon by gun violence,” Hogsett said. “As we count the number of homicides, one thing remains certain for victims, for their families and for the neighborhoods tormented by this violence: any number above zero is too high.”

Hogsett said IMPD has seen a net gain of 119 officers compared to 2015 staffing levels. The department has returned to community-based beat policing. In addition, the Office of Public Health and Safety hired a team of Indy Peacemakers to intervene in high-crime areas and the city invested roughly $3 million in grassroots organizations engaged in crime prevention.

“For all of these efforts, for all of these investments, we have seen progress this year. Robberies down 15 percent, residential burglaries down almost 14 percent,” he said. “Overall violent crime down nearly 8 percent. These drops contributing to overall a more than 5 percent decrease in crime throughout Indianapolis.

Data showed a significant increase in IMPD’s clearance rate, which was 42% in 2017 and 65% in 2018.

Hogsett said the city, with the support of the City-County Council, will invest in more technology for officers to help track violent criminals and crime trends in the city.

“There is substantial reason for hope,” Hogsett said. “Law enforcement, neighborhoods, faith leaders and legislators have come together to combat the scourge of violent crime in our city. By many indicators we are already seeing signs of success, but by continuing to work together, we will make our city safer for all. We will make our streets and our neighborhoods more peaceful. We will be one city.”

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