Hundreds of flights in Chicago canceled due to winter storm

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An electronic board shows flight delays and cancellations at O'Hare International Airport after a winter snowstorm. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

CHICAGO, Ill. — People throughout parts of the Midwest woke Saturday to a heavy and steady snowfall that forced the cancellation of hundreds of airline flights and made driving dangerous.

More than 460 flights were canceled Saturday morning at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport in Chicago and about 50 flights were canceled at Chicago’s Midway International Airport. In the Detroit area, many motorists were moving well below posted speed limits along freeways due to slushy conditions.

The snowfall is part of a wall of hazardous weather that trekked from the Dakotas and across the Great Lakes states, headed toward New England. The National Weather Service has warned that conditions in the Northeast “could approach blizzard criteria.” Some areas in the storm’s path saw ice instead of snow.

The storm was forecast to bring between up to 10 inches of snow to the Midwest before walloping the Northeast on Sunday, where it could dump up to 2 feet of snow.

Amtrak canceled some trains Saturday from Chicago to Washington and New York and between New York and Boston and Pennsylvania on Sunday.

Chicago was forecast to receive as much as 8 inches and wind gusts in the Chicago area are expected to reach 35 mph.

In Nebraska, authorities closed Omaha’s Eppley Airfield on Friday afternoon after a Southwest Airlines plane slid off an ice-slicked runway. No one was injured.

The National Weather Service in Albany, New York, said snow could fall at a rate of 1 to 3 inches an hour, creating “difficult to impossible travel conditions” in areas.

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