Police records claim argument during a cornhole game led to deadly north side shooting

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – Court records are providing new details into what led up to a deadly shooting outside a popular strip mall on Indy's north side.

The violence took place late Tuesday on east 82nd street just a few blocks east of the Keystone Fashion Mall.

Police say an argument outside Drake’s led to gunfire that claimed the life of Jason Frazier.

Jean Eyongegbe (Photo courtesy of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department)

Court records claim the suspect Jean Eyongegbe and a friend walked by and said something insulting to one of Frazier’s three friends who were playing a game of cornhole.

The affidavit claims in response one of Fraziers friends, “Threw one of the cornhole bags… then exchanged words” with the suspect and his friend.

At first both sides walked away, but after sitting in their car for a few minutes, police say Eyongegbe and his friend decided to get out and fight Frazier’s friend.

During that fight, Eyongegbe allegedly confessed to police “Frazier continued towards him and he shot Frazier one time.”

Police say all too often shootings stem from the inability to resolve conflicts without gunfire.

Just last week three men were shot and one man died following an argument outside a gas station on Mooresville road.

Last month, a fight between two men on Indy’s east side spilled into the street and 53-year-old Phillip Toombs died after having his throat cut.

Police say all were sparked by simple arguments.

In fact, going back to 2016, arguments and fights have been the leading cause of homicides, followed by robberies, drugs, and domestic issues, according to numbers provided by IMPD.

That’s why experts say resolving conflicts without violence is critical to making the city safer.

“Conflict resolution, crime and poverty are all interconnected,” said Mariah Ivey with Peace Learning Center.

Ivey says their group offers training and advice to parents, kids, teachers and others about how to resolve conflicts peacefully.

“We tend to focus on the preventative aspects and that is how can we change our language and how we do live with one another,” said Ivey.

Mariah says they key to avoiding so much of the city’s violence is simply talking to and treating each other with respect.

“I believe when you acknowledge the humanity in another person, you’re able to respect them regardless of the disagreement,” said Ivey.

The suspect who lives in Texas was in Indianapolis training for a new job.

He remains behind bars in the Marion County jail without bond until criminal charges can be filed.

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