Community heartbroken after teen siblings found murdered in Indianapolis

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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — We are learning more about the teenage siblings murdered Friday on the Indianapolis’ northeast side.

Investigators say 16-year-old Nicholas Nelson and 15-year-old Ashlynn Nelson were found dead in their home.

A 15-year-old suspect is in custody, police reported Monday.

A brisk walk through Indy Urban Acres is all it takes to know why Nicholas loved this place so much.

"I’ve had 500 kids or so that have worked Indy Urban Acres. These are high school kids from all over the city. I would put Nick at the top," Indy Urban Acres Farm Manager Tyler Gough said.

It wasn’t because he was good farmer. He had something special. He had the heart.

"There was something deeper in him that wanted to give back to the community, give back to his family and where he lived," Gough said.

Nick enjoyed fencing. He wanted to go off to college.

"I was proud of him for everything he did. He was working hard. He was a straight A student," said Nicholas’s mentor Drew Tharp.

His sister Ashlynn had goals too.

This summer, she spent time at CAFE summer camp working at a senior center.

"The nursing home that she interned at and all the other kids she interned with had nothing but great things to say. How well she worked with the senior citizens," CAFE summer camp Director Jamarro Johnson said.

The teenage siblings had a full life ahead of them, but their lives were taken away.

They were killed inside their home and no one can understand why.

"I knew Nick was not involved in any sort of activity that might lead to something like this," Tharp said.

"There will never be closure for me. I’ll never understand how this happened. I’ll never understand how someone could do this to Nick and his sister," Gough said.

People are heartbroken and they’re outraged.

"Nick was a kid that did everything the way he was supposed to do," Gough said.

Gough says the community has failed Nick and Ashlynn, and something must change.

"Nick was an absolute asset to the farm, to his family, to everyone that he touched. That fact that he was murdered means we as a community have to do better for him. For kids like him," Gough said.

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