Staying dry and unseasonably warm; tracking active weather in the tropics

This September now ranks the third driest to-date in Indianapolis this Friday morning! Very little rain has fallen around central Indiana, which has resulted in some locations to see abnormally dry conditions and even moderate drought conditions according to the latest Drought Monitor update. We really could use the rain! Indianapolis has only received 0.01” of rain since the first of the month! Rain chances today remain low, but an approaching cold front will bring a more favorable chance for rain at the end of the weekend.

There are going to be mainly dry conditions today with increasing cloud cover. However, a nearby boundary could produce a couple isolated showers or storms during the afternoon hours. Many areas will still be in good shape for high school football games this evening, but it will be unseasonably warm! Highs will climb into the mid to upper 80s this afternoon. The average for the date is 76° in Indianapolis.

We will have a dry start to the weekend as temperatures continue to rise near 90°. There is a slow-moving cold front west of the state and it will move closer to the Indianapolis area by Sunday evening. Rain chances will hold off for those tailgating for the Colts! Kick-off at 1 PM will be dry, but showers could be on radar at the end of the game. Most of the rain will likely fall late Sunday night into Monday morning as the boundary travels over central Indiana.

Temperatures will become more seasonal as we start fall on Monday! Lingering showers early will give way to some sunshine by Monday evening. Temperatures will begin to warm back up next week with above average highs returning to the area.

The tropics are still very active this Friday morning. Imelda brought more than 40” of rain for some communities in southeast Texas! North Fork Taylors Bayou received 43.35” and Green Pond Gully had 40.87” if rain! Both totals exceed the total amount of precipitation in Indianapolis (36.56”) since January 1!

Humberto is now considered a post-tropical cyclone, while Jerry strengthens to a Category 2 hurricane. Jerry is producing sustained winds at 105 MPH and is expected to bring flash flooding to the northern Leeward Islands. There are also three named tropical storms in the eastern Pacific this morning.

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