IN Focus: Rep. Bucshon, Rep. Pence discuss impeachment hearings, possible shutdown

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INDIANAPOLIS - Rep. Larry Bucshon (R-IN) appeared on this week's edition of IN Focus to discuss a wide range of issues, including the recent impeachment hearings and the looming possibility of another government shutdown later this month.

"This is a partisan sham and the goal is simply to impeach the President as fast as possible," said Bucshon. "The public hearings, in my mind, didn't show much more than hear-say testimony and people's opinions."

Bucshon also expressed opposition to the idea of censuring President Trump, a potential alternative to impeachment.

"I don't think he did anything illegal that's impeachable," said Bucshon. "I think that the President, in his phone call, probably shouldn't have mentioned former Vice President Biden's name. I think that was a political mistake, but I don't think it's illegal to investigate corruption."

Rep. Greg Pence (R-IN) also shared his thoughts on the issue after an event in Shelbyville last week.

"It’s a sham," said Pence, who felt some Democrats may be cooling on the idea of impeaching the President. "I noticed yesterday in some of the interviews on national television that they seem to be backing off a little bit, so I don’t think impeachment is a foregone conclusion."

But in the midst of everything else, could we be on the verge of another government shutdown?

Bucshon and Pence both feel lawmakers will eventually reach a deal to prevent another shutdown later this month.

"I don’t think we’ll be doing that again," said Pence.

"We've encouraged the President to continue to work with House Democrats to get a funding deal," said Bucshon. "I don't think we'll have a government shutdown."

In the video below, Bucshon also discusses two of his legislative priorities dealing with recycling and also with the issue of maternal mortality. We also asked about the recent House bill that could pave the way for federal legalization of marijuana, and whether Illinois' move to legalize marijuana next year will pose a problem along the Illinois-Indiana border.

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