Family, community rally downtown following shooting death of Andre Green

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INDIANAPOLIS,Ind. (Aug. 11, 2015)-- "Justice for Andre."

That was the rallying cry during a demonstration Tuesday night at Monument Circle. The protest was in honor of Andre Green, 15, who was shot and killed by Indianapolis police late Sunday night.

Green's family has been very vocal in the days following the shooting.

"He didn't deserve to die like that. Yeah, you say it was a gun, but we didn't see it," said Green's aunt, Monica Lamb.

According to police, officers were following a car from an armed carjacking around 10:15 p.m. in the 3100 block of Thompkins Square Court. The suspects allegedly shot out the windows at citizens as they fled the scene.

Around 11 p.m., police spotted a vehicle that matched the description of the vehicle stolen in the carjacking.

The vehicle turned onto Butler Avenue into a cul-de-sac, and the officers turned on their lights to initiate a traffic stop. An Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department (IMPD) spokesperson said the vehicle then rammed into the driver’s side of a police car.

Police say multiple passengers got out of the suspect vehicle and ran between the fence line of a nearby apartment complex. The driver of the vehicle, later identified as Green, refused to comply with the officers’ requests to get out of the vehicle. Police say he again tried to hit officers with the vehicle, and narrowly missed.

Three officers fired at the car, striking Green, who got out of the vehicle with a handgun and then immediately collapsed. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police say Green was on home detention during the shooting. IMPD Chief Rick Hite understands emotions are high, which is why he could be heard on several radio stations Tuesday afternoon.

"We will go  wherever we have to go in order to the message across that we care. Kids have their own underground culture and way of getting information," said Chief Hite.

"How do they know he was armed?  We know someone fired but we don't know if it was the young man or the two men who fled," asked Amos Brown during his afternoon radio talk show on WTLC-AM1310.

"All indications indicate that the driver was armed and he was involved in the car jacking," Chief Hite responded.

"Why is someone who is out on home detention allegedly car jacking a car when they ought to be home? To me that is a failure of that system," said Brown.

Family members describe Green as a kid who has made some wrong decisions, but they are confident he was going to turn his life around.

"He was a good kid. He was just mixed up a little bit. He took a wrong turn but he didn't deserve to be gunned down by police," said Lamb

However, investigators point to Green's social media and criminal past to illustrate a different side of the teen. There are several photos depicting Green with a gun in his hand and his waistband.

"It's easy just to follow one narrative and discredit the victim whereas if you have body cam footage that is an unbiased viewpoint on a situation," said J.R., a member of Indy10, a grassroots social movement.

Green's family is outraged at the lack of video evidence from the shooting. There is no body camera video or dashcam footage. IMPD said in a press conference that it's common for police cruisers to not have dashcams.

"I think there is now a growing expectation among the public for that evidence. I think it's coming from law enforcement, I think its coming from the community," said Brown.

"We do have to talk about long-term investment in our future. Kids are none of our history but 100 percent of our future," said Chief Hite.

Several community organizations and activists are asking the public to come forward if you witnessed the shooting or if you captured cell phone video of the encounter.

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