INDIANAPOLIS — A 17-year-old is dead following a shooting on Indy’s east side. The violence reflects a deadly trend this year.

Early Monday morning Cortez Glass was found inside a car that had been riddled with bullets along Ritter avenue. The 17-year-old died hours later at the hospital.

Police wouldn’t confirm a motive for the deadly shooting, but the victim’s family believes the shooting may have been retaliation for a different homicide involving the victim’s twin brother back in April.

Court records show Cortez was killed just over four months after his twin brother, 17-year-old Comfort Glass, was charged with murder following a deadly shooting on W. St. Clair.

Murder charges and booking photo for Comfort Glass

“It is sad. It’s kids killing kids. This is not the way it should be. That’s somebody’s son,” said Reverend Malachi Walker with Young Men Inc.

Reverend Malachi Walker doesn’t know the Glass twins, but he works with at-risk youth and is alarmed by this year’s violence numbers.

“The overall homicide rate among youth is growing and that’s a big concern,” said Walker.

In fact, while overall homicides are down compared to last year, youth homicides are on the rise.

The 16 juvenile victims killed so far this year is only one shy of the total for all of last year.

“Youth violence is absolutely top priority for us,” said Shardae Hoskins with OPHS.

In addition to providing grants to fund youth-serving programs, the city’s Office of Public Health and Safety is also partnering with high schools to find ways to reach out to kids about how to resolve conflicts without gunfire.

“So we’re hoping some of the new Peacemakers will be in every high school in the city so we can get in front of things before they become issues on the street,” said Hoskins.

“Our young people have to try to learn to settle differences other than taking the life of someone else,” said Walker.

So far no arrests have been made for the homicide on Ritter.

Anyone with information about this incident should contact Detective Gregory Shue at the IMPD Homicide Office at (317) 327-3475 or by e-mail at Gregory.Shue@indy.gov.