Pence’s role during Capitol riots, what’s next before inauguration

Politics
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INDIANAPOLIS — Vice President Mike Pence played a major role as chaos erupted at the United States Capitol following a Pro-Trump rally.

U.S. Department of Defense officials say it was Pence who approved the order to deploy the national guard to the Capitol, not President Donald Trump.

January 6 was the first time the U.S.Capitol was breached since 1814 by the British. This time, Trump supporters took over the solemn and sacred halls. The Capitol was left raided and ransacked until an all-clear was given that allowed Vice President Pence to move forward with the certification process.

“I never second guessed his loyalty to the constitution, and he proved it again yesterday,” said Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb.

Governor Holcomb spoke highly of his predecessor and added that he believes Pence has a bright future in politics ahead. Other political experts are also in agreement.

“Vice President Pence showed he puts principal over politics and party, and I think it shows that he has a lot of longevity left in his political future,” said University of Indianapolis Associate Professor of Political Science Laura Wilson.

This came after the president made no public appearance except for on social media, creating a critical moment for the vice president.

“That certification process is critical. It’s necessary going forward for the country, and it’s something the vice president stood up and completed a task that needed to be done the kind of usher in that closure and that next step for the American people,” said Wilson.

Now, many members of Congress are looking at the vice president and how he can navigate the next 14 days until inauguration.

“This is a moment for him to demonstrate to the American people what leadership is and a really kind of forge forward the end of the Donald Trump administration,” said Wilson.

Many in the Senate and House are now calling for the removal of the president by use of the 25th Amendment, Section 4.

“It would take the VP and a majority of the cabinet to activate this,” said Indiana University Associate Professor of Law Nicholas Almendares.

The 25th Amendment basically declares that the president is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.

“I think there’s a real question as to whether the president should continue at this point. He is responsible for an insurrection against the Capitol of the United States. Those are words I never dreamed I or anybody else would ever speak,” said former Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly (D).

President Trump can object, which will then require a 2/3 vote by Congress before Pence could take over. Congress then would have 21 days to vote, yet the transition of power is in 14 days.

“I think for all intents and purposes, just be smart to let lie what has happened and to move forward with other processes rather than trying to remove the president,” said Wilson.

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