INDIANAPOLIS — Unfortunately, hackers love Amazon Prime Day as much as any bargain shopper because it gives them a chance to steal your information and/or take your money.

According to Check Point, Amazon-related phishing attacks are already up 37% in July over June’s average. Chief Security Information Officer Pete Nicoletti said hackers love to exploit the relationship between Amazon and its customers specifically during Prime Day.

Usually, a huge financial headache begins with a phishing email.

“You know, we’re seeing an average of $350 and 13 to 15 hours worth of time is spent trying to recover an account take over,” Nicoletti said.

Cybersecurity experts say they urge people to log into the website directly instead of clicking any email links.

“Asking for things like ‘Hey, click here to update your payment information’,” Gary Brickhouse, CISO at GuidePoint Security, said. “So from that they’re also able to grab either a credit card number or other means of payment that you might want to leverage as well.”

Nicoletti said your passwords need to be as unique as your online shopping carts.

“If you’re re-using your password, stop right now,” Nicoletti exclaimed. “You’ve got to have a name and password that’s unique for each website. Do not reuse your passwords.”

Experts said they advise you also set up two-factor authentication and download a password manager.

“We want a password manager that can create complex passwords, that is customizable so you can pick the length or the complexity of them,” Brickhouse explained.

Experts added that you should never answer security questions with an obvious response.

“Really the easiest thing there is to just put in false answers that you can remember,” Brickhouse said.

Nicoletti said the website HaveIBeenPwned.com will let consumers know if their information’s been compromised.

“Load in your email address,” Nicoletti said. “There’s almost 12 billion records there from several thousand breach sites.”

Check Point has listed specifically what to do if you receive a suspicious email and more advice to secure your data during Amazon Prime Day. You can read that information on its website.